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20 Feb, Wednesday
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Before and After: Collection Renovation

I love stuff. I just love stuff so much that sometimes it gets out of hand way before I have any chance to wrangle it into a home, so that it doesn’t clutter up my space. For as much as I love stuff, I hate clutter. It’s a daily struggle, and one of the biggest where-the-hell-do-I-put-all-this-stuff challenges came from my camera collection.

 

I have over 25 old to vintage cameras that I’ve been collecting over the years. There’s no rhyme or reason to it, I just like how they look, and if I encounter one in my garage sale journeys, I buy it. It’s a constant reminder to how far we have come as a society in terms of photographic advancement, and I hope one day one of my ‘modern’ cameras ends up on someone’s vintage self years and years down the road, so that they too can wonder how us geezers shot on such primitive equipment.

The problem is; they’re bulky. Vintage cameras weren’t really known for being ‘sleek’ or ‘streamlined’. Usually they’re just heavy hunks of metal and glass, and they almost never have perfect angles or sides to allow them to fit into one another. My initial solution to this was as most people would be, a shelf from Ikea. Turns out sawdust boards and glue coated pegs wasn’t an ideal choice for something that weighs over 200 pounds. Imagine building an ikea shelf and having a grown ass adult stand on it…it would probably work, but you’d be scared.

 

Immediately after we moved into our loft, Daniel expressed this concern. “It looks like the leaning tower of Pisa!” he remarked. It did. It was very much not 90 degrees, at any joint, and was starting to look very parallelogram-ish after years of abuse, and a constant battle with gravity.

So Daniel, being Daniel, set out to find something that wouldn’t come crashing down in the middle of the night, and came up with this. Elegant, simple, and really surprisingly strong, some people call it garage wall shelving, or track shelves. All you have to do is screw two or three vertical pillars into the studs of your wall, and from there you can configure it however you want! It was a dream come true. Tons of shelf space, rearrangeable to however I wanted it, and no more fears that it would collapse onto Coco’s dog home at 2pm some afternoon while we were out.

 

The best part? The cost. Really it depends on how big of shelves you need, and how many pillars you’re using, but for us, both of these shelves, slats, screws, and even a stud finder was less than $100. Even Ikea can’t beat that.

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